May 26, 2019
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Update, DOST Study: DOH Says Synthetic Acetic Acid in Vinegar ‘Not Necessarily Unsafe’

Updated, today, May 21, 2019:

(SDN) — Be careful what vinegar brand you put in your food!

It could be a matter of health, or a cause of degenerative diseases. Like Parkinson’s Disease. Even cancer.

This is because a study made by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) has established that of the 17 vinegar brands tested in the Philippines, most of them were made from “synthetic” sources, not from natural sources. Thus, they are “fake” and adulterated vinegar.

And they are dangerous to peoples’ health.

But a later clarification from the health department said synthetic acetic acid in vinegar products “are not necessarily unsafe.”

Only three brands passed PNRI’s (DOST-Philippine Nuclear Research Institute) nuclear-based analysis: 15 brands were manufactured using synthetic acetic acid, which is a raw material for making vinyl, among other products. Synthetic acetic acid is a by-product of petrochemicals.

PNRI, which conducted the tests, said these adulterated brands contain elements that can cause “various degenerative diseases.”

However, PNRI did not identify the brands that are deemed “fake” based on the agency’s “Isotope Studies” because naming them is against the law. Moreover, the tests were done using only codes for the products bought from across the country.

The risks remain if any of these vinegar brands is put in one’s food.

“One can only imagine all the impurities and residues from the petroleum by-products, which can be the source of various degenerative diseases,” PNRI Nuclear Analytical Techniques Applications Section Head Raymond Sucgang said in a statement reaching SDN — Science and Digital News.

He said synthetic acetic acid should not be used for food. It is used in making vinyl for flooring for durability; a raw material for shellack product.

Synthetic acetic acid comes from fossil fuels, petrochemicals, a by-product in the production of diesel, oil, and such, he added.

“So, it (synthetic acetic acid) is very dirty to the point that it can cause cancer and degenerative diseases like Parkinson’s, and others,” said Sugcang in an exclusive interview on May 9.

“We Filipinos are fond of cooking ‘adobo’, ‘sawsawan,’ and ‘paksiw’. Sometimes (in my family), we used the synthetic vinegar without my knowledge. So, we buy our vinegar from Aklan.”

Vinegar which is very popular in cooking can be easily bought from groceries. Or, even in “sari-sari” (neighborhood) stores.

PNRI is the country’s agency for research and development (R&D) in nuclear energy’s peaceful uses, among other functions. It conducted the “Isotope Studies” on the vinegar brands.

Sugcang said that they submitted their findings on the 17 vinegar brands they put under nuclear testing using 360 samples (not 360 brands as reported in a national daily) to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for appropriate action.

The PNRI has asked the FDA to formulate a national vinegar standard for the protection of Filipino consumers.

Findings on the 17 tested vinegar brands in the Philippines using Isotope-based analytical techniques showed that most of these products — 8 out of 10 — are synthetic and “fake” and not made from acetic acid derived from plants, the agency pointed out.

Sugcang said they took 360 samples from across the country to really determine if a vinegar brand being manufactured and sold in the country is using natural or synthetic sources. In that way, you can really say if it’s adulterated.

Obviously, synthetic acetic acid should not be the source for making vinegar.

“Condiments usually undergo the process of fermentation, and the raw materials must come from fruits and other natural products,” Sugcang emphasized.

Sugcang pointed out that the three other vinegar brands tested were also using acetic acid but from plants, not from by-products of petrochemicals.

His team’s research project distinguishes vinegar and other condiments from natural or plant-based sources from those which are derived from petroleum-based sources.

DOST PNRI suka 1

A PNRI researcher conducts analysis of vinegar samples using the liquid scintillation counter. (Photo: DOST-PNRI)

PNRI explained the use of Isotope.

Isotope techniques help to detect the adulteration in vinegar through radiocarbon assay using carbon-14. The natural vinegar coming from plants will have traces of carbon with natural radioactivity, unlike those made from synthetic raw materials.

The agency said the results of the vinegar studies were submitted to the FDA, and hopefully serve as a basis for the development of a new Vinegar Standards of the Philippines.

Sugcang said the PNRI asked the FDA which is under the Department of Health (DOH) to embody in the proposed standard the used only of nuclear-based testing because it is the only technique that cannot be deceived.

He said the government allows any kind of testing. There are two kinds, he said, conventional testing and nuclear technology testing.

The problem is that conventional testing can be deceived, pointing out that putting more yeast on a synthetic acetic acid “suka” (vinegar) can come out through conventional analysis as “natural” because yeast is fermented.

“That’s the weakness of conventional testing,” he said.

“But nuclear-based testing,” Sugcang said, “cannot be deceived because what is being put to analysis is the vinegar’s carbon (element).”

He assured that,

“The radiocarbon assay is very accurate in detecting synthetic vinegar. All natural biogenic vinegar have 12 disintegrations per minute (Dpm) per gram Carbon (gC) or above that. Below that, vinegar is deemed to be adulterated. Synthetic vinegar have zero to 2 dpm/gC

“The test was validated using natural and synthetic vinegar samples. Detection limit for C14 measurement is below 1Dpm/gC.”

PNRI researchers are also developing isotope analytical techniques for use in detecting synthetic by-products in other condiments such as ketchup, fish sauce or “patis,” and soy sauce or “toyo.”

State-of-the-art equipment such as the liquid scintillation counter and the isotope ratio mass spectrometer will be used to study the isotope composition of these condiments, particularly carbon-13 and nitrogen-15.

Meanwhile on Wikipedia, it says that, “Isotope analysis is the identification of isotopic signature, the abundance of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within organic and inorganic compounds.”

In other developments at PNRI, the agency announced that it’s hosting a Balik Scientist who formerly worked at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Austria.

The Filipino scientist, Dr. Thomas Neil Pascual, signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) recently for the DOST’s Balik Scientist Program (BSP) with Arcilla at the PNRI compound in Diliman, Quezon City.

Pascual, the PNRI said, is “(a)n expert in nuclear medicine” and “will collaborate with PNRI under the national health R&D agenda in the field of nuclear and radiation applications in medicine.”

DOST PNR

Dr. Carlo A. Arcilla, director of the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (DOST-PNRI) affixes his signature on the MOA as Balik Scientist Dr. Thomas Neil Pascual smiles. The PNRI will host the returning scientist from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for a project on nuclear medicine. (Photo: PNRI)

They inked the MOA at PNRI headquarters. PNRI will host Pascual who “who will collaborate with PNRI under the national health R&D (research and development) agenda in the field of nuclear medicine and radiation applications in medicine.”

PNRI’s hosting of Pascual is under the aegis of the DOST’s Balik Scientist Program (BSP) created in 1975. The BSP’s objective is to encourage Filipino experts, scientists and researchers based in foreign countries to come back to their homeland and contribute their expertise to the improvement of various fields and fields.

The Balik Scientist joined the IAEA, a partner of also of PNRI in many projects, in 2012 and handled capacity building projects in Africa as well as in Asia and the Pacific region.

“His pioneering work in nuclear medicine includes the establishment of the first nuclear medicine facility in Cambodia and the conduct of nuclear medicine training at the St. Luke’s Medical Center (Philippines),” the PNRI noted.

The Institute continues to open its services to customers from various sectors on the use of its nuclear analytical techniques for their products. PNRI’s analytical laboratories and services are certified under ISO 17025:2005 and under ISO 9001:2015. (SDN)

52 thoughts on “Update, DOST Study: DOH Says Synthetic Acetic Acid in Vinegar ‘Not Necessarily Unsafe’

  1. Good day po. Are you entitled to give out the names of those fake brands? If you are, please do give them out, so that we would be aware of it. Research would be useless if it stays within your own cubicle. As well as reports. This article was reported and yet, no brands were given out which leaves the people wondering and now….quite angry. If there’s fake vinegars, there’s fake reports or research out there too, because of lack of evidence or proof….? I do hope those fake brands will be named out the soonest. That’s all. Thank you and God bless.

    1. Hi Ma’am:

      Hope you are doing fine.

      Thank you for reading.

      The news about this study conducted by the DOST-PNRI also came out on GMA7 evening news, without naming any of the brands, the 15 or the 3. A GMA7 reporter went to PNRI in Diliman, Quezon City, near Iglesia ni Cristo compound and interviewed Mr. Raymond Sugcang of PNRI; no brand was named either.

      In my report here on SDN — Science and Digital News, I mentioned why the names of the brands cannot be mentioned (it’s against the law, and PNRI conducted the nuclear-based tests with only a code on each brand (without names on the 360 samples so even the researchers will not know the brands to avoid being biased). I asked what are the names, he declined for the reasons above. He added he did not know the names of the brands either because only a code was written on each samples’ container.

      It cannot be a fake research because PNRI is a reputable government agency that is advocating and promoting the use only of peaceful use of nuclear-based technology (Isotope, etc.) because it is the ONLY test that cannot be cheated (or as Mr. Sugcang said, hindi kayang pulusutan). By nuclear technology, the testing does not involved harmful radiation.

      The PNRI has already submitted to the Department of Health-Food and Drug Administration (DOH-FDA) the results as the proper agency to do the appropriate action, either warning consumers about the tests’s results, etc. Similarly, the PNRI has asked the DOH-FDA to formulate a National Vinegar Standard in the Philippines which should specify that only nuclear-based testing must be allowed by the government.

      Currently, all kinds of testing of food products is allowed, Mr. Sugcang said, and that’s where “pulusutan” occurs, meaning that any adulterated product put into test may come out clean because test parameters can be cheated in conventional testing (as explained in the article).

      Personally, I think consumers should try and go to DOH-FDA and ask for the names. The DOH-FDA knows a lot about safe and unsafe food and even cosmetics and other products in the market, it can give information on other products also. A visit to the DOH-FDA maybe the best approach to learn about it. The agency also publishes on its website products in the market that are unsafe for consumption, or those that did not pass DOH-FDA standards.

      This is not fake news either, the source is from a reputable government agency; otherwise, GMA 7 news will not report it.

      Mr. Sugcang told me the DOST-PNRI had formed a Working Group for the crafting of vinegar standard and those present included those who were found to be manufacturing “suka” using the unhealthy synthetic acetic acid which is use for making vinyl, among others. Others present in the meetings of the Working Group are church representatives, and other sectors, in order to come up with a well-rounded National Vinegar Standard in the Philippines.

      What I do for every product that I buy/consume, I make it a point to buy those that were manufactured by reputable companies.

      Maraming salamat po, and God bless.

      1. Sir ang GandA naman ng reply mo dito. How about us here from the province? Magtatravel pa kami papunta ng maynila? Grabe naman Yun. Are you for public service or only for personal interest? Why can’t dost take all samples from named brands and publish it in a national news or in ptv? I am sure most of consumers especially the poor don’t have time for that. They cannot even spend for a whole meal 3times a day. Tapos babyahe pa papunta ng maynila?

      2. Maraming salamat po sa comment. Ang totoo po niyan pare-pareho tayong hindi alam ang mga brand. Kung sinabi ng PNRI or FDA kung anong mga brand iyan, sigurado mailalabas na ang mga pangalan. The study was from PNRI, then passed it or submitted to FDA. It’s the FDA that has the authority/responsibility to reveal the names, but they said they have to test the brands using FDA’s own test protocols.

        Let us wait po, sila lang talaga ang nakakaalam ng mga pangalan.

        Me personally, I always buy the brands manufactured by big companies although I am not sure if they vinegar is not adulterated. Just have to live with my decision.

        It is something like this: Many people know alcoholic drinks and smoking can cause TB, or even cancer perhaps. But people are still buying them, although there are proofs drinking alcoholic drinks and smoking are harmful to the health.

        So, ingat lang po tayo.

    2. If it is illegal to name the brands who are using cancerous substances, IS IT ALSO ILLEGAL TO NAME THE ONES WHO ARE LEGIT?!
      At least the public will be guided accordingly…

    1. Good morning, po, Ms. Ann, thanks a lot for reading, I appreciate it.

      May I post here the reply I gave to another reader who also asked for the names of the brands. God bless and take care:

      “Hi Ma’am:

      “Hope you are doing fine.

      “Thank you for reading.

      “The news about this study conducted by the DOST-PNRI also came out on GMA7 evening news, without naming any of the brands, the 15 or the 3. A GMA7 reporter went to PNRI in Diliman, Quezon City, near Iglesia ni Cristo compound and interviewed Mr. Raymond Sugcang of PNRI; no brand was named either.

      “In my report here on SDN — Science and Digital News, I mentioned why the names of the brands cannot be mentioned (it’s against the law, and PNRI conducted the nuclear-based tests with only a code on each brand (without names on the 360 samples so even the researchers will not know the brands to avoid being biased). I asked what are the names, he declined for the reasons above. He added he did not know the names of the brands either because only a code was written on each samples’ container.

      “It cannot be a fake research because PNRI is a reputable government agency that is advocating and promoting the use only of peaceful use of nuclear-based technology (Isotope, etc.) because it is the ONLY test that cannot be cheated (or as Mr. Sugcang said, hindi kayang pulusutan). By nuclear technology, the testing does not involved harmful radiation.

      “The PNRI has already submitted to the Department of Health-Food and Drug Administration (DOH-FDA) the results as the proper agency to do the appropriate action, either warning consumers about the tests’s results, etc. Similarly, the PNRI has asked the DOH-FDA to formulate a National Vinegar Standard in the Philippines which should specify that only nuclear-based testing must be allowed by the government.

      “Currently, all kinds of testing of food products is allowed, Mr. Sugcang said, and that’s where “pulusutan” occurs, meaning that any adulterated product put into test may come out clean because test parameters can be cheated in conventional testing (as explained in the article).

      “Personally, I think consumers should try and go to DOH-FDA and ask for the names. The DOH-FDA knows a lot about safe and unsafe food and even cosmetics and other products in the market, it can give information on other products also. A visit to the DOH-FDA maybe the best approach to learn about it. The agency also publishes on its website products in the market that are unsafe for consumption, or those that did not pass DOH-FDA standards.

      “This is not fake news either, the source is from a reputable government agency; otherwise, GMA 7 news will not report it.

      “Mr. Sugcang told me the DOST-PNRI had formed a Working Group for the crafting of vinegar standard and those present included those who were found to be manufacturing “suka” using the unhealthy synthetic acetic acid which is use for making vinyl, among others. Others present in the meetings of the Working Group are church representatives, and other sectors, in order to come up with a well-rounded National Vinegar Standard in the Philippines.

      “What I do for every product that I buy/consume, I make it a point to buy those that were manufactured by reputable companies.

      “Maraming salamat po, and God bless.”

    2. Opo, SDN is also interested in knowing the brands. At least the 3 brands that passed the test of DOST-PNRI. SDN is trying to get hold of the vinegar brands that passed the nuclear technology test.

      Maraming salamat po.

  2. When can the brands be disclosed? And who has the authority to decide on it? Shouldn’t the consumers/public’s health be the utmost priority? By not disclosing the brands, we are just protecting the big businesses behind this.

    1. Thanks for joining the dialogue, makes for a rounded conversation. I am not sure who has the authority, but my hunch is the DOH-FDA.

      If we remember, the DOH has the list on its website of unsafe products of every kind.

      I think consumers should get together and write and petition the DOH to disclose the companies manufacturing and selling “fake suka” or vinegar made out of petrochemicals’ by-products, which the PNRI said is dirty and can cause Parkinson’s Disease, even cancer.

      Imagine, synthetic acetic acid is a raw material for making vinyl and other products, not for food.

      Acetic acid from plants is the safe and right ingredient for vinegar. Not the synthetic one.

      Maraming salamat po.

  3. This article/research is useless to the consuming public unless results on specific brands are revealed. You are just creating panic, confusion and anger. You could at least reveal the brands of the safe products and do away with failed brands if legal implications are your concern.

    1. Salamat po sa inyong reaction, and thanks for reading. SDN appreciates readers’ interaction.

      As you can read in the comment thread, you will know why the names of the fake suka or vinegar were not included.

      If SDN can get the names of the 3 brands that passed the tests that DOST-PNRI conducted, surely it will be published.

      While SDN appreciates your time and comment, the term “idiots” is rather a strong word.

      Let’s be civil and avoid name-calling.

      Still, thanks a lot.

    1. Yes, Ma’am:

      I would like to do that, but for now I don’t have the names. At least if I can get the 3 that passed. I’ve been trying to get the names from DOST-PNRI.

      Once I get it, if ever they give me, I will have this story updated, or write a separate story altogether.

      Maraming salamat po. I appreciate your reaction.

      God bless.

    2. Yes, Ma’am, SDN will do that, once the 3 names are available from DOST-PNRI. Let us start looking at the label of every product that we buy, particularly the vinegar or “suka.”

      Maraming salamat po.

  4. What is the point of telling us all of this if you will not tell us the defective brands? I really don’t get it!

    1. Yes, of course, SDN really would love to do that, at least the 3 brands that DOST-PNRI found to be OK because they used acetic acid from plants, not the synthetic. SDN is trying to get the 3 names. Once I get them everyone will know it.

      Thanks a lot for the reaction. SDN appreciates it very much.

  5. What is the real findings or actual experimental result that deemed synthetic acetic acid can be a a cause diseases compared to natural synthetic acetic acid? Chemically they are the same, molecularly they are the same as well. If we are talking about radioactivity, the radioactivity of those won’t be enough to make any harm due to that carbon-14 in acetic acid synthetic or otherwise has not enough radioactivity to cause harm. I would suspect plant based acetic acid has higher Carbon-14. Living organism has Higher C-14 because it is being replenished (basis of carbon-14 dating). They need to be specific here science wise. Scientist need thorough investigation before they go on public. Is this peer-reviewed results? What is the actual analysis? I an skeptical the mere radioactivity measurement or amount of different isotope is enough to make these speculations about the safety of synthetic or plant based acetic acid.

    1. Hi Sir:

      Thanks a lot for your inputs, SDN really likes these exchanges of opinion; they are really helpful and healthy for a dialogue and sharing of ideas. SDN, rest assured, will try to get answer for the concerns you mentioned.

      Maraming salamat po.

      1. I would suggest remove this article because this is misinformation. I have a Phd in chemistry and I disagree with the speculation in this study. Contacted my colleagues as well who has doctoral degree in chemistry, we all agree. This is non-sense and waste pf time and DOST fund. Disseminating this news will just cause unnecessary panic! I

      2. SDN respects your suggestion; but you may have to suggest it also to GMA7 online to remove theirs (it’s in print media, too) because they also have this piece of news as well as others. And the Kapuso network also had aired recently, similarly quoting PNRI that synthetic acetic acid which is being used to make vinyl acetate, synthetic leather, etc. can or may cause degenerative diseases, as well as cancer.

        SDN thinks that not to mention the adverse effect of adulterated/fake vinegar to human health, those manufacturing “suka” using by-products of petrochemicals must be put to task. They could be violating health regulations and some laws by producing “fake” vinegar products. But that is not for SDN to do.

        Here’s an update from PNRI:

        ​”The radiocarbon assay is very accurate in detecting synthetic vinegar. All natural biogenic vinegar have 12 disintegrations per minute per gram Carbon or above that. Below that , vinegar is deemed to be adulterated. Synthetic vinegar have zero to 2 dpm/gC.

        “The test was validated using authentic natural and synthetic vineg(a)r samples po. Detection limit for C14 measurem(e)nt is below 1Dpm/gC.”

        Congratulations on your Chemistry doctorate, the Philippines sorely need your kind. The DOST has a program called Balik Scientist Program (BSP), which has already attracted many Filipino scientists working abroad to come back and offer and share their expertise for the benefit of the nation and the citizens. SDN hopes you consider coming back, if you are not yet back to the country. If you wish, you may access http://www.dost.gov.ph and look over their the Balik Scientist Program and its benefits for returning scientist, researchers.

        Again thanks.

  6. Hi, I am very interested to know the accuracy of the analytical method. Is this even validated? What is the detection limit. I have experience in handling radioactive measurement and so I am very hesitant to believe this unless DOST provides validation data. Also the body cannot differentiate a synthetic vs natural acetic acid and so even an analytical technique. The best way to do that is go and audit the manufacturing facility and check their materials and the process.

    This is really misleading and is causing panic to the public.

    1. Hi Ma’am:

      Maraming salamat po. Your reaction as well as the others’ are really appreciate. There is a need to convince the DOH-FDA to come up with a Vinegar Standard of the Philippines, which should promote only nuclear testing technology, which DOST-PNRI said is the only one that can’t be cheated or fooled.

      SDN is reaching out to the PNRI to get answer for the concerns you raised. This will be conveyed to you, perhaps, tomorrow.

      Rest assured you shall get your answer.

      Warm regards, SDN.

    2. Hi Ma’am:

      Hope you are fine and doing well.

      Here’s an update from PNRI:

      ​”The radiocarbon assay is very accurate in detecting synthetic vinegar. All natural biogenic vinegar have 12 disintegrations per minute per gram Carbon or above that. Below that , vinegar is deemed to be adulterated. Synthetic vinegar have zero to 2 dpm/gC.

      “The test was validated using authentic natural and synthetic vinegsr samples po. Detection limit for C14 measuremnt is below 1Dpm/gC.”

      SDN hopes you are even just a bit clarified.

      The Food and Drug Administration of the Department of Health (DOH-FDA) said this morning they will reveal the names of the vinegar brands found to be using synthetic acetic acid. One caveat: Once they get to the truth (meaning the FDA will test the 17 brands using FDA’s own protocols and reveal those found to be manufacturing adulterated vinegar.

      Maraming salamat po.

      1. Thank you for this information. It is good if the method is validated prior to use. What is the basis for the claim that a vinegar that uses synthetic acetic acid can cause cancer or degenerative diseases? A radioactive study may differentiate a natural vs synthetic acetic acid but labelling use of synthetic acetic acid as “cancerous” is misinformation. A food grade synthetic acetic acid should be safe for use and consumption. As pointed in one of the comments above, a natural and synthetic acetic acid are chemically and molecularly similar.

        If they are concerned about the impurities in the synthetic acetic acid, then they should analyze the levels of those potential impurities before declaring that these “failed brands” are dangerous for human consumption.

  7. I don’t deny that your intention is good and you are doing this for the public, but again we need to be careful about this. Acetic acid from natural sources or synthesized would have the same structure. If you they are concern about vinyl acetate content of they so called “fake” suka, mind you, biogenic acetic acid can also be converted to vinyl acetate and be used for leather manufacturing. They should have determine if there is a statistical/measurable amount of vinyl acetate on those “fake” suka. This determination will not take them hours and relatively easy and cheaper that using isotope measurement.

    This news only cause unnecessary confusion and some netizens are asking now what brands not to buy and even not using “suka” until you release the brands that are biogenic driven.

    I do applaud DOST for checking, but again, at the end of the day we are all scientist, and we need to be careful about the information we disseminate. They could hold up the news and do a GC-MS run, and look for vinyl acetate, which will not take them hours.

    Also, I also contacted GMA7.

    1. Maraming salamat po ulit.

      Two FDA officials on a Radio DZBB interview on Thursday, May 16, promised to release/reveal the names of the 15 brands, but after putting them to FDA’s own test protocols and if found to be as DOST-PNRI had reported.

      Sir, would you willing to be quoted using your comments/reactions here, SDN would be glad to put them into a news report? It would enrich the discussion about these 15 brands of “suka.”

  8. It’s always a problem, there are test conducted , recall products, informing us about the toxic chemical content of the product etc. But the brand name of the product was almost always unknown to the public. Need ba na magbayad muna ang company/ pharmaceutical para ayusin agad ang problema para hindi sila ma apektuhan. This is useless info kung walang name ng product. Alam namin data privacy but kung public health concern naman, ano ang gagawin ng consumer. Magtitiis na lng , basta kayo ay May research na na conduct tapos na.

    1. Maraming salamat po sa comment.

      In an interview by Radio DZBB on Thursday, May 16, officials of the Food and Drug and Administration (FDA) promised to reveal the names of the brands which PNRI had found to be using synthetic acetic acid. But the FDA, they said, using its own test protocols, will first test the said brands and if they are found to be really of synthetic acetic acid, the FDA will reveal the 15 brands. PNRI said earlier that only the FDA can reveal the names.

    1. Thanks a lot for the reaction.

      Gusto po ng SDN na sabihin ang mga pangalan, subali’t hindi po ibinigay ng PNRI. Ang sabi ng PNRI, FDA lang ang pwedeng magsa-publiko. Ang problema, idadaan pa raw ng FDA sa kanilang sariling test protocols, at doon lang nila ilalabas pag napatunayan nila na gumagamit ng synthetic acetic acid ang mga nasabing 15 vinegar brands.

      Maganda siguro ay ang FDA ang hingan ng pahintulot para sabihin na nila ang mga pangalan.

  9. i agree those that passed shld be made public. what’s the point of the this article if the public will not be fully informed. it will just scare people or most likely ignore.

    1. Thanks a lot po.

      SDN has been communicating with PNRI to get at least the three brands that passed the Isotope nuclear testing/analysis. Still waiting for them to give the names. But the PNRI said it cannot reveal the names of the brands that they found in their tests to be adulterated or “fake” vinegar because it is against the law. Only the Food and Drug Administration can do it.

  10. Please supply us the brand names. This study won’t serve its purpose if the brand won’t be disclosed. Will these brands be recalled from the market?

    1. non sense.this information is not supported with details.how come that naming those unhealthy vinegar products would violate laws if it is for good of consumers?also,this post did not include the three vinegar products that are good for the health..

  11. This news is useless because it failed to list the names of the erring brands. How about the brands that are safe?

  12. you want us to be aware but you cant tell us what are brands that we need to avoid?

    it does not make any sense! eh ano nag papasikat lang kayo?

  13. The author/s should be the one most vigilant to compel FDA in revealing the names of those brands which either passed the test or of those which failed. Otherwise, the article, even the research itself, doesnt really serve any purpose that to create panic among the consuming public.

    This article and comments must go viral in order to solicit action from the govt.

    1. Thanks for pointing that out, about getting the government to act. In fact, the PNRI is also seeking support for the creation of a vinegar standard that cannot be deceived, using nuclear technique.

      Here’s a follow up to the story, the Department of Agriculture has taken cognizance of the controversy. Which is good for the consumers, which is all of us.

      Thanks for the reaction. Here’s a follow up story on the controversy about the “fake”vinegar brands.

      https://scitechanddigital.news/2019/05/18/da-seeks-meeting-with-dost-doh-dti-over-fake-vinegar-issues/

  14. Hi po!
    Hindi ko na tinapos lahat basahin ang comments pero ang article tinapos sa pagaakala na kahit ang ingredients man lang mabanggit sa 15-3 na mga suka for us to have a hint man lang sana. Thanks anyway sa information aantayin namin ang result ng FDA.

    1. Hi Ms Arah, thanks a lot for reading and understanding how the system runs.

      Though how strong you want to convince them to release the names, if not proper to do so, they will not make it public because there is still a process to be followed.

      We are all anxious to learn about the “fake” suka brands, or at least the “genuine” ones.

      Let us hope the meeting among DA, DOST, DOH and DTI will push through tomorrow, May 20, as called by Agriculture Secretary Manny Piñol after learning about the controversy.

      Here’s the story about it: https://scitechanddigital.news/2019/05/18/da-seeks-meeting-with-dost-doh-dti-over-fake-vinegar-issues/

      Let’s wish a successful meeting and for the consumers’ benefit.

  15. I guess Dr. Arcilla made the same point I had in CNN and clear this issue. Please watch is and edit or write a new article.

    1. Thanks for the heads up. I appreciate it. I saw a news on GMA7 about the meeting/press conference. I am gathering information for another article.

      May I include some of your comments here?

      1. Hi Edd,

        Let me know what are you going to use, or if you want just email me so I can answer some question or point you the right person. I am a trained inorganic and synthetic chemist (PhD in inorganic Chemistry) . I can point you to people who has PhD in analytical chemistry who are really expert in this field.

      2. Hi Doc,

        Thanks a lot. I got our email, and will send you some questions tomorrow. You are right about this. So, it would be better to pursue this further. There are some questions in how they handled this issue. I would be interested in knowing if there are really some journals that say synthetic acetic acid causes degenerative diseases, or if it is not harmful to health, are there studies to these effect, etc. Is safe for the short-term, how about the long-term ingestion by human. But I will put these questions via email to you, no need to answer it here.

        Thank you very much, looking forward to learning more about the issue. Take care.

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